Gray Street Council School, Bootle

 

Names on Memorial
BIOGRAPHY RANK FORENAME SURNAME REGIMENT MEDAL OTHER
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also Service Records Library and Archives Canada

  FALBEN
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  C HALLANSON
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also Service Records Discovering Anzacs

  ABAILEY
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  ABOOTH
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  RBRISCOE
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  CBROWN
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also Service Records Discovering Anzacs

  TBURNETT
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  R WBUSHELL
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  T CBUSHELL
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  G ACOOPER
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  WCOTTRELL
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  W LCOVENTRY
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  ACUMMINGS
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  JCUMMINGS
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  R WDAVIES
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  JFAIRHURST
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  JFAZAKERLEY
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  AFISHPOOL
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  JFRY
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  T RFURMSTON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  RGOODWIN
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  WGORDON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  FHALLS
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  AHARRISON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  R JHELM
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  FHEMANS
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  OHUGHES
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  O LJOHNS
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  RJOHNSON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  RJOHNSON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  WJOHNSON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  HJONES
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  G CKIRBY
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  G CKIRBY
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  JMARRIOTT
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  R HMATHIESON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  FMETCALFE
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  D CMOORHOUSE
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  J RMORGAN
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  EMURPHY
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  GOAKLEY
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  T HPARRY
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  T KPENNEY
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  JRHODES
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  A FROBERTSON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  WROBERTSON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  W CSHEPHERD
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  CSMITH
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also Litherland Digital
also RAMC in the Great War
  W G ASMITH
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  W TSMITH
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  E CSOUTHWARD
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  HSTREFFORD
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  F STENNANT
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  H TTOY
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  E ETRUMBELL
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  J JWHITBY
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  A YWILLIAMSON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  AWOOD
 

The creation of the Memorial

 
GRAY STREET "OLD BOYS."
PROPOSED MEMORIAL TO FALLEN HEROES.
     It is the desire of the teachers of Gray Street School, Bootle, that there should be set up a mural tablet showing the names of the Gray-street "Old Boys" who have made the supreme sacrifice in the course of the late war. The Headmaster wishes to make known the great difficulty he has always experienced in attempting to compile a full and authentic list of those who have fallen, such difficulty arising because of the great majority having left before his appointment to the school, thus rendering them unknown to him. In these circumstances he makes an earnest appeal to all relations and friends to help him by forwarding to the school, as early as possible, the names of old scholars who have fallen in the struggle.
 

WALTON TIMES Friday 24th January 1919

 
GRAY STREET SCHOOL.
UNVEILING OF SCHOOL WAR MEMORIAL TO GALLANT "OLD BOYS."
     The War Memorial Tablet raised in remembrance of Gray-street School "Old Boys" who fell in the late war, was unveiled at the school on Wednesday of last week. A brief and devoutly solemn service was held in connection with the ceremony. The Mayor and Mayoress of Bootle (Mr. and Mrs. H. Pennington), the Rev. J.C.G. Mercer, Vicar of St.Leonard's Church, and Mr. P. Knowles were present, taking a leading part in the proceedings, and the large assembly of relatives and friends of the fallen, teachers, "old boys," and others interested, testified to the depth of the desire to pay in full this last respect to the heroic dead.
     In the course of his address, the Headmaster (Mr. R. Raby), after welcoming those present, said these "Old Boys" had, in very truth, as inscribed on the memorial, "fought the good fight, dying in the cause of humanity that honour might live." It was right that he should refer briefly to the great difficulty he had experienced, in many directions, in compiling their roll of fallen heroes, owing to their having ended their schooldays before his appointment to the school, as this would account in part, at least, for possible omissions, but he assured them that if any further names were forwarded to him they would be added to those already on the tablet, but though he had never known them in person, he could say that he most certainly knew them in spirit, ever feeling their influence a living presence round him. The debt owing to them was incalculable and un-repayable. The memorial table, which he was sure would be admired by all who saw it, and every name on which was surrounded by a halo of glory, would always serve to remind both present and future pupils of the self-sacrifice and devotion to duty of those "Old Boys." But he knew he voiced the feelings of all his hearers, and more particularly the relatives of the honoured dead, those who were "flesh of their flesh, and bone of their bone," when he said that despite the undying glory won by such sacrifice, everyone earnestly and prayerfully wished that no others would ever be called upon to endure, in like manner, the same toil, and tribulation, and agony which their heroic dead had had to bear.
     No more comforting message could have been brought to the bereaved ones than that chosen by the Rev. Mr. Mercer from I. Thess. iv., 13-18. The message was given with clear, vibrant, sympathetic voice, the beautiful words bringing much needed consolations to the relatives of those who, in the words of the text, "had died in the Lord."
     The calling of the Roll of the Fallen was almost poignantly impressive. This honourable duty fell to Mr. J. Dixon. Loudly, clearly, sonorously, rang out the first name; then an impressive pause - a tense silence - but no answer came. And so on, to the end of the long list of sixty noble names; the Roll had been called for the last time, and a striking phase, perhaps the most striking phase, of the service was ended.
     Then all stood whilst the Mayoress, by pulling a tasselled cord, caused the Union Jack to fall from before the tablet. Scarcely had the flag come to rest when Mr. Knowles, whose two sons are old scholars of the school, stepped forward, took up his position in front of the tablet, and sounded the Last Post. As the final note of the bugle died away, a choir of boys and girls broke into a lamentation for the dead - "How are the mighty fallen in the midst of the battle! They were lovely and pleasant in their lives, and in their death they were not divided. How are the mighty fallen, and the weapons of war perished!" The music of the Lament, composed expressly for the occasion by Mr. Leitch Owen, who presided at the piano throughout, was in harmony with the words, and contributed not only to the beauty of the service, but also to the fulness of the message of comfort conveyed to the mourners.
     The Mayor followed with a short address in which he endorsed and amplified all that Mr. Raby had said, and added that it was clear, after all they had seen and heard, they could rest assured that the destinies of their boys and girls attending the Gray-street School were in safe keeping. As he had done before at the unveiling of school war memorials, so here he paid a glowing tribute to the boys of the school who had gone out to fight for right against might. In conclusion, he offered his sincere sympathy to the relatives and friends of the fallen.
     At the conclusion of the address, Mr. Dixon thanked the Mayor, the Mayoress, the Rev. Mr. Mercer, and Mr. Knowles for their kindly presence and assistance. He was supported in the vote of thanks by Mr. R.T. Robinson. The Mayor suitable replied.
     The service was very reverent and impressive, and everyone felt that this, with every school in the land, had taught her sons and daughters to "play the game."
     A modified service, modelled as closely as possible on the above, was held by the girls and boys of the school on the following morning.
 

WALTON TIMES Friday 6th February 1920