St.Leonard's C.of E. Church, Bootle

 

Names on Memorial
BIOGRAPHY RANK FORENAME SURNAME REGIMENT MEDAL OTHER
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private C SAITKEN
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  JohnALGEORN
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Gunner Charles HALLANSONRFA
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Gunner J TBARRATT
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also Liverpool Remembrance

Gunner HBECKLEYRGA DCM
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private WilliamBELLAS4th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  Henry JBOULTERRNR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private George HBOURNE7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private James HBOWLERGG
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Lance Corporal William GBOYCE7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Lance Corporal RobertBROOMHALL1st RWF
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Private Charles SBROWN7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  Thomas CBUSHELLRN
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private WilliamCAMPBELL7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Sergeant Archibald JCARRIER13th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private James ACHEGWIN7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  James ACHEGWINRN
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private ThomasCOLLIER1st RWF
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Gunner SamuelCOOKRFA
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  George ECOOPERRNR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private George GCORKHILL7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private William LCOVENTRY7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Sergeant GordonDEMPSEY20th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private HughDEMPSEY12th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Lance Corporal William GDIXON1st RWF
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private John MortonEDWARDS1st RWF
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private Berthal MEVENSON7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private Charles G FEVENSON12th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Lieut JFAZAKERLEY
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Corporal AlfredFISHPOOLRE
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private T JFLEMING
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private John HFORDAVC
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Gunner WilliamFORRESTERRFA
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private WilliamFOSTER2nd SR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private EdwinFRANCIS7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also St Helens Soldiers
also St Helens Rolls of Honour
Private W AFRENCH
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private JulesFRY11th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private E WFULLERTON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private Thomas RFURMSTON7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  William CGLAZEBROOKRN
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private JosephGREENWOOD3rd RWF
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Gunner H JGRIFFITHS
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private  HARDY
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  FrederickHEMANSRN
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Corpl D SHINCKS
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  LeonardHOLDINGRNVR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Gunner WHOWARD
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also St Anne's Great War Memorial, Stanley

Private  HOWARTH
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private Arnold HHULME7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also Masonic Great War Project

Eng Com CharlesHURSTRNR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private CharlesJAY1st KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also Masonic Great War Project

Sergeant JamesJEFFERSON7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private Owen LJOHNS2nd O&RLI
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private RobertJOHNSON10th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private StanleyJOHNSTON7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  William GJONESRN
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private George CKIRBY13th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Corpl CharledLEA
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private Ernest VLEE7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private GeorgeLOGAN3rd KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also Service Records Discovering Anzacs

Private NLUNT
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Corporal Arthur MALINSLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private John MARRIOTT3rd KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private GeorgeMASSEYRE
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private SamuelMAWBEY7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Gunner JamesMAWDSLEYRGA
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  FredMEDCALFRNVR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private EdwardMURPHY18th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private Frank VNARRACOTT18th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Lance Corporal WilliamNORTH1st KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Sergeant FrederickORR1st KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Gunner WilliamPARTRIDGERFA
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private Andrew VPEARSON6th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private JamesPERRY7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private F GPIKE
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private RobertPRITCHARD7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Gunner William RPURVISRFA
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private Edward BQUAYLEMGC
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  MichaelRAFTREERN
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Lance Corporal Henry LRICHARDS7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private Edward BRIDER9th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  William CROBERTSRN
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Corporal Alexander FROBERTSON10th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private GROBERTSON10th KLR Died 1917
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private FredROGERS4th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private C SSALMON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Corporal John JSCOTT5th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Gunner JohnSHAWRFA
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private William CSHEPHERD7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Lance Corporal CharlesSMITH12th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private Harold JSMITH7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private William TSMITH17th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private T HSNEYD
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  RalphSTEENRMLI
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also Service Records Library and Archives Canada

Corporal WSTEEN49th Can Regt Died 1917
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Gunner W RSTEPHENS
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private James ASWARBRICK8th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private SidneyTHOMPSON7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private Albert LTHOMSON7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private Harry DTODD14th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private DavidTOMLEY12th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private EdwardTOMLEY7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private H JTOY
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private Ernest ETRUMBELL7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Corpl F JWATSON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private Samuel HWEBBER18th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Gunner PWILLIAMS
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private Albert VWILLIAMSON7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private Owen RWILLIAMSON7th KLR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Private WilliamWILLIAMSON7th KLR
 

The creation of the Memorial

 
A WAR MEMORIAL.
UNVEILING AT ST.LEONARD'S CHURCH.
ADDRESS BY BISHOP OF SODOR AND MAN.
     The Mayor of Bootle (Dr. James Pearson), the Deputy Mayor (Councillor B.E. Bailey), the Town Clerk (Mr. J. Spencer Tumilty), and other members and officers of the Corporation attended a crowded service at St.Leonard's Church on Sunday night. The occasion was the unveiling of a memorial tablet recording the names of those associated with the church and parish who have fallen in the war. This has been presented to the church by Councillor James Scott, an old and esteemed member of the congregation, and the unveiling ceremony was performed by the Lord Bishop of Sodor and Man (Dr. J. Denton Thompson), the first Vicar of St.Leonard's.
     Visitors began to arrive quite an hour before the time appointed, and when service commenced the church was filled to its utmost capacity. Seats were set apart for relatives of the fallen heroes. The service was conducted by the Rev. J.C.G. Mercer, M.A., B.D., Vicar, assisted by the Rev. S.H. Breeze. Special Psalms and Lessons appropriate to the occasion were selected, and the singing was hearty and reverent. Among the hymns were "God of our fathers," "On the Resurrection morning," and "For all the saints who from their labours rest."
     The unveiling took place after the Nunc Dimittis had been sung, when those taking part were preceded by the choir to the west end of the church, where the memorial forms a striking object. The Mace-bearer (Mr. T.H. Lawson), bearing the Borough Mace, headed the procession, which was in the following order; The Mayor, Deputy Mayor, and Town Clerk, the Churchwardens (Messrs. A. Audus and E.H. Roose), Councillor James Scott (donor of the memorial), the Rev. S.H. Breeze (curate of St.Leonards), Mr. T.R. Wright (Scripture reader), the Rev. J.C.G. Mercer (Vicar), the Bishop of Sodor and Man, and the Rev. H Harding Jolly, M.A., acting as Bishop's Chaplain.  
     Those taking part in the unveiling formed up on three sides of the font, which faces the memorial, and after dedicatory prayers had been offered the Bishop, standing on the steps of the font, was handed a tasselled cord by Mr. Walter Scott. As his Lordship pulled the cord two large Union Jacks drew apart, disclosing a handsome mural tablet, already bearing the names of ninety gallant men - including one D.C.M. - who, going forth from St.Leonards, have given their lives "For God, for King, and Country."

THE MEMORIAL.

     The memorial consists of three brass panels sunk in a massive tablet of carved and polished oak, surmounted by a pedimented cornice and having a carved base. The large centre panel is divided from those on either side by ornamented pillars, and similar pillars form the sides. Under the cornice are carved the letters I.H.S., and a floral design shows the rose, shamrock, and thistle. At the top of the centre brass panel is the inscription "To the glory of God and in memory of those connected with St.Leonard's Church and Parish who fell in the great European War this tablet was erected by James Scott, Esq., Merton-road, Bootle." Then follow the names (which are given at the end of this report). Each of the side panels has a cross in red at the top, and the rest of the space is happily so far devoid of names, though as the great conflict continues these must be inscribed. Inlet below the panels are the inscriptions on brass: "Unveiled by the Right Rev. the Lord Bishop of Sodor and Man (Dr. J. Denton Thompson), 13.1.18. Rev. J.C.G. Mercer, M.A., B.D., Vicar. Mr. A. Audus, Mr E.H. Roose, Churchwardens."
     After the  unveiling "O rest in the Lord" was feelingly sung by Mr. Arthur Weber, of Liverpool Cathedral choir, and the clergy and choir returned to the chancel. "Crossing the Bar" was effectively rendered by the choir as the anthem.
     It was announced by the Vicar that the offertory would be on behalf of the fund for the St.Leonard's Parish Memorial, which it was intended should take the form of a new organ. The people of the parish had collected about 400 among themselves, and they felt justified in now appealing to a larger public to aid in perpetuating the memory of those brave and noble men who had fought and died for us, and whom he could say from personal experience more than deserved the tribute. If they took St.Leonard's down and rebuilt it in gold it would still be little enough in comparison with what these gallant men had given.

THE BISHOP'S ADDRESS.

     The Bishop of Sodor and Man based a powerful discourse on Heb. xii. 1. As a nation and Empire, he said, we were passing through a period of crisis without parallel in the world's history. It was one fraught with momentous issues for the whole world. This war had torn away the mask by which Germany had concealed her policy and character. If the relentless militarism, permeated with anti-Christian feeling and intoxicated with a lust for power and tyranny, knowing no mercy nor justice, which had brought about the war, were not arrested, it would end in the sovereignty of cruelty and tyranny in the world. In the great crisis of to-day, every man and woman, no matter of what rank and standing was called upon to do his or her very best if the war was to be won. Thinking of all those who had given their lives, thoughtful people must ask: "To what purpose is this waste?" The answer was that it must ultimately mean victory.
     Proceeding to touch on parochial topics, the Bishop said it was a source of satisfaction to him to know that St.Leonard's was now adorned with a beautiful memorial of their fallen heroes. They welcomed the Mayor and others representing the Municipality, who had come there to evince not merely a personal but also an official interest in their proceedings at the unveiling. That place to him was one of the most dearly-loved spots on earth, and it was gratifying to meet many who had come from Southport, on the one side, and Liverpool, on the other, in order that they might assemble as one family once again in their old church. Of those who were with them at the beginning many had passed, but they had still tender memories of them. His own boy, who had won the Military Cross and was now lying wounded in hospital near Birmingham, had been signed with the Sign of the Cross at the font of their church, and he was sure he might convey to him the good wishes of St.Leonard's people.
     Upon the application of this text, his Lordship said in contemplating that memorial they must all feel admiration for the men who had died for people, King and country, for Empire, and the world at large. Our Lord was a voluntary Sufferer - a vicarious Sufferer, and that self-same spirit had animated thousands of our men. The Cross stood for sacrifice, but it also stood for victory. These days were very dark, and a terrific crisis drew near. He believed Field-Marshal Haig would hold the line, but owing to the chaotic condition of Russia tens of thousands of enemy troops were being brought to the Western Front, making the position still more critical. We must prepare for even greater sacrifices in the near future, but we were giving our men and boys for truth and honour, for liberty and freedom, for righteousness and civilisation. They could not, they would not die in vain. Through their deaths we would live and, in a purified national life, a welded Empire and a brotherhood of nations, would pass through death to victory.
     The Last Post was sounded by the Cadet buglers and an impressive service closed with the singing of the National Anthem.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.

     The names of the fallen which are inscribed on the memorial are as follows:
William C. Roberts,   R.N.,  
Michael Raftree,   R.N.,  
Thomas C. Bushell,   R.N.,  
John Algeo,   R.N.,  
William G. Jones,   R.N.,  
Frederick Hemans,   R.N.,  
William C. Glazebrook,   R.N.,  
James A. Chegwin,   R.N.,  
Fred Medcalf,   R.N.V.R.,  
Leonard Holding,   R.N.V.R.,  
Eng. Com. Charles Hurst,   R.N.R.,  
George E. Cooper,   R.N.R.,  
Henry J. Boulter,   R.N.R.,  
Ralph Steen,   R.M.L.I.  
Privates George G. Corkhill,      
  Harold J. Smith,      
Sergeant James Jefferson,      
Privates Owen R. Williamson,      
  Edward Tomley,      
  Sidney Thompson,      
  Samuel Mawbey,      
  Edwin Francis,      
  Thomas R. Furmston,      
  Charles S. Brown,      
  Ernest E. Trumbell,      
  Arnold H. Hulme,      
Lance Corporal William G. Boyce,      
Privates William Campbell,      
  Stanley Johnston,      
  William Williamson,      
  William C. Shepherd,      
  Robert Pritchard,      
  James Perry,      
  George H. Bourne,      
  William L. Coventry,      
  Albert L. Thomson,      
  Albert V. Williamson,      
Lance Corporal Henry L. Richards,      
Privates Ernest V. Lee,      
  James A. Chegwin,      
  Berthal M. Evenson,   7th K.L.R.  
Private Andrew V. Pearson,   6th K.L.R.;  
Privates Fred Rogers,      
  William Bellas,   4th K.L.R.;  
Privates George Logan,      
  John  Marriott,   3rd K.L.R.;  
Private Charles Jay,      
Sergeant Frederick Orr,      
Lance Corporal William North,   1st K.L.R.;  
Private William T. Smith,   17th K.L.R.;  
Privates Edward Murphy,      
  Samuel H. Webber,      
  Frank V. Narracott,   18th K.L.R.;  
Private Harry D. Todd,   14th K.L.R.;  
Privates Jules Fry,   11th K.L.R.;  
  Charles G.F. Evenson,      
  David Tomley,      
Lance Corporal Charles Smith,      
Private Hugh Dempsey,   12th K.L.R.;  
Sergeant Archibald J. Carrier,      
Private George C. Kirby,   13th K.L.R.;  
Sergeant Gordon Dempsey,   20th K.L.R.;  
Corporal John J. Scott,   5th K.L.R.;  
Private Edward B. Rider,   9th K.L.R.;  
Private James A. Swarbrick,   8th K.L.R.;  
Private Robert Johnson,      
Corporal Alexander F. Robertson,   10th K.L.R.  
Lance Corporal Robert Broomhall,      
Private John Morton Edwards,      
Lance Corporal William G. Dixon,      
Private Thomas Collier,   1st R.W.F.;  
Private Joseph Greenwood,   3rd R.W.F.;  
Gunners William Forrester,      
  William Partridge,      
  John Shaw,      
  William R. Purvis,      
  Samuel Cook,      
  Charles H. Allanson,   R.F.A.  
Gunners H. Beckley, D.C.M.,    
  James Mawdsley,   R.G.A.;  
Private George Massey,      
Corporal Alfred Fishpool,   R.E.;  
Private Owen L. Johns,   2nd O. & R.L.I.;  
Private William Foster,   2nd S.R.;  
Private Edward B. Quayle,   M.G.C.;  
Corporal Arthur  Malins,   L.R.;  
Private John H. Ford,   A.V.C.;  
Private James H. Bowler,   G.G.;  
Corporal W. Steen,   49th Can. Regt., 1917;
Private G. Robertson,   10th K.L.R., 1917.
 

BOOTLE TIMES Friday 18th January 1918

 
HEROES OF THE WAR.
BOOTLE MEMORIAL UNVEILED BY SIR T. ROYDEN.
     In the presence of a large congregation, Sir Thomas Royden, Bart., M.P., unveiled at St. Leonard's Church on Sunday, a beautiful mural tablet erected in memory of fallen members of the church and parish. This tablet presented to the church by Councillor James Scott, was formally uncovered by the Bishop of Sodor and Man (Dr. J. Denton Thompson, first Vicar of St. Leonard's) on January 13th last year. At that time about ninety names appeared on the tablet. Since them additional panels have been completed, and the Roll of Honour now comprises about two hundred names.
     Sunday evening's service was attended by the Mayor (Councillor H. Pennington), the Deputy-Mayor (Alderman James Pearson), Councillor B.E. Bailey, the Town Clerk (Mr. J. Spencer Tumilty), and other members of the municipal body. Among the large congregation were leading residents of the borough and district and many relatives of men whose names appear on the Roll of Honour. Sir Thomas Royden, who read the Lessons, occupied a seat in the chancel.
     Hymns appropriate for the occasion were selected, the first one being "God of our Fathers." The officiating clergy were the Rev. J.C.G. Mercer, M.A., B.D., Vicar, and the Rev. S.H. Breeze, curate. The second lesson read by Sir Thomas (Thess., I., 4) included the singularly appropriate and comforting words, "I would not have you to be ignorant, brethren, concerning those which are asleep, that ye sorrow not even as others which have no hope, for if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so them also which sleep in Jesus will God bring with him."
     After the Nunc Dimittis, the unveiling ceremony took place. Those taking part, preceded by the choir, walked along the central aisle from the east to the west end. They included in addition to Sir Thomas Royden, the Mayor, Deputy-Mayor, Councillors, Churchwardens, clergy, and Councillor James Scott, donor of the tablet. The latter, which occupies a striking position on the west wall, was temporarily veiled by flags. Sir Thomas, by means of a cord, drew the flags apart, revealing the tablet. With this Sir Thomas said. "In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, and in the presence of this congregation, I unveil the names of our brethren fallen on the field of honour in a righteous cause. May their glorious deeds ever be remembered and their example of sacrifice be followed."
     The vicar said further Prayers, and Mr. Arthur Weber, of Liverpool Cathedral choir, gave an effective rendering of "O Rest in the Lord." The Last Post was sounded by cadet buglers.
     After the unveiling, the choir sang the anthem, "Hark, hark my soul" (Shelley). Mr. L. Smith taking the alto and Master Tom Williams the treble. This reflected the highest credit on the choir and soloists, and also Mr. C.R. Bradley, the talented organist, who was responsible for the musical arrangements.

THE ADDRESS.

     The Vicar (Rev. J.C.G. Mercer) preached from the words, "None of us liveth to himself, and no man dieth to himself." Romans, xiv., 7. Before proceeding, he intimated that their offertory would be for the Memorial Organ Fund, on which behalf they still required 400. The organ was to be a parish meorial of their fallen heroes, and they were hoping that it would be worthy of their beautiful church. They were met as a representative congregation. They had with them Sir Thomas Royden, their Member, whom they all welcomed, and they desired to assure him of their support in the great work that he was doing for Bootle and the nation at large. They had also the Mayor and Councillors to encourage them in the pursuit of their object, which was to practically demonstrate their appreciation of the men who gave their lives for the freedom of their fellows, and had enabled them to pursue their course along paths of peace to happiness. He assured their relatives who were left behind that the names of their beloved ones would never sink into oblivion. We had come, he trusted, to the end of the greatest war in history, and they had been made to realise in a very tangible way that we were all dependent one upon another. No man could live to himself. The notes of their new organ would remind them and future generations that they owed their freedom and their liberty to the men who had died on their behalf. From personal experience he could truthfully say there was no soldier like the British soldier who had fought and conquered Prussian militarism. Nor was their any sailor like the British sailor. Our glorious Navy and our Mercantile Marine had kept us alive and enabled us to do what we had done. They had to thank God that He had given these grand qualities to our race, enabling them to use those qualities on behalf of the cause of justice and righteousness, and that the triumph of those qualities had opened up to the world a glorious future, a future that if we only stuck together for the promotion of common good would be a future full of prosperity and happiness. These brave lads had proved that after all we were not as our late enemies had supposed, a deteriorating nation to be readily overcome, but that we had still the British grit which characterised our forefathers. 
     During the offertory, "For all the Saints who from their labours rest," was sung, and after the Benediction service closed with the hearty singing of the National Anthem.
 

WALTON TIMES Friday 4th July 1919

 
MUSIC AND WORSHIP.
DEDICATION OF ST.LEONARD'S WAR MEMORIAL.
     At a largely attended special service in St.Leonard's Church, Bootle, on Saturday afternoon, the Bishop of Liverpool, with appropriate ceremonial, dedicated a new organ which worshippers and friends have provided in memory of parishioners who fell during the war. The congregation included the Mayor and other representatives of the municipality, and a number of local clergy assisted in the service.
     The organ is a three-manual (compass CC to C, 61 notes) of the most up-to-date type, the action being tubular pneumatic throughout, and possessing several notable features. A great boon in intricate music is the balanced "grand crescendo" pedal, which is little known in British organ building, but by means of which the performer can gradually or quickly attain to the full power of the organ without using a composition pedal or removing his hands from the keyboards. The large number of couplers fitted (16 in all) enables a great many unusual and interesting combination to be made. The six piston stops placed above and corresponding to the choir organ draw-stops almost constitute a separate "organ," as one combination may be drawn on these, and a different one on the draw-stops, and by means of pistons placed under the choir keyboard, the organist can change from one combination to the other without removing his hands from the keys. Three balanced pedals are fitted, "Swell," "Choir," and "Crescendo." The Pedals (32 notes, CCC to G) are radiating and concave. The instrument is of very fine tone and well-balanced, the choir organ being particularly pleasing.
     There is also plenty of power, and the instrument in the hands of a capable performer, is equal to the demands of the finest church music.
     The blowing of the organ is by an improved electrical plant, operating feeders supplying different wind pressures to the reservoirs, and controlled by a push button beside the keyboards. This apparatus, as also the console and side cases of the organ, was fitted by Messrs. J. Scott, Ltd., of Bootle.
     The instrument, which has cost 1,300 and requires approximately 200 to finally complete, has been built by Messrs. Hill & Sons and Norman and Beard, of London, and is placed on the North side of the chancel, the old organ, which is to be retained and used at certain times, occupying the South side. The display pipes are of the plain unturned metal.
     The service, conducted by the Vicar (Rev. J.C.G. Mercer, M.A., B.D.), and the Rev. S.H. Breeze, comprised appropriate hymns, the Lesser Litany, prayers and specially selected collects, the Lesson being read by the Ven. Archdeacon Spooner, and Psalm 150 sung. Then followed the Dedication, the Bishop saying "In the Faith of Jesus Christ, and in memory of the men from this parish who gave their lives in the great War, we dedicate this Organ to the Glory of God in the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, Amen." Appropriate prayers followed, and the anthem, "Praise the Lord."
     The Bishop preceded his short discourse with a few momentous words of general advice. "Before I pass to my sermon," he said, "I want to impress upon members of this congregation your bounden duty at this time to pray for our country. We are passing through a most serious crisis, and no one can foretell what may happen to our land. But we know that God reigns, and we can ask Him with all faith to lead us through these troublous times to paths of Peace. The Collects your Vicar has chosen for this service, those for the fourth Sunday in Advent, and the fifth Sunday after Trinity, would be very appropriate for use privately."
     Selecting as the basis of his discourse the words "It came to pass when the minstrel played that the hand of the Lord came upon him" (II Kings iii., 15), the Bishop dealt aptly with the subject of music as an accessory to public worship. That organ which had just been dedicated was their memorial to those dear and gallant sons of theirs who had given their lives to sustain the freedom and honour of our country. It was a remarkable thing that organs were regarded in the early Church as so essentially pagan that Christians were not allowed to use them, and even within the memory of man they were, in some parts of Scotland, looked upon as an accursed thing. But we had come to regard the organ as the chief of musical instruments. Rightly used they knew it was a great help to worship. It was quite right that in every neighbourhood there should be some church with a very highly ornate musical service. In the new cathedral they had, through the generosity of a munificent lady of that very neighbourhood, one of the finest organs in the world. That money was not wasted, it was only given to God. But it was absolute folly for the parish church to try to give a cathedral service. Nothing was more disturbing or painful, and the organ should make for congregational singing. It taught a more intelligent use of hymns and psalms which the people sang, and made the service more devotional.
     "The ordinary congregation," said his Lordship, "does not come to church to listen to the choir and the singing, and they are irritated when the music is of such a character that they can't join. The meagre congregations over which men mourn to-day are largely due to efforts to copy without adequate means the Cathedral choir or the choir of a great parish church which dominates the town. No, the organ was to help congregational singing, and he trusted it would be the beneficial result of the new, beautiful and powerful instrument they at St.Leonard's had just secured."

OPENING RECITALS.

     In connection with the opening and dedication of the organ, a series of recitals has been given. Mr. Charles R. Bradley (organist and choirmaster of the church) gave recitals after the Dedication Service on Saturday, and after the Sunday evening Service. The programmes were: - (Saturday) Triumphal March (Lemmens); At Evening (Dudley Buck); Adagio (Beethoven) a trio for two oboes and English horn. (Sunday) March for Church Festival (W.T. Best); Cavatina (Raff); Improvisation; Prelude in E Flat (Porter); Festive March (Smart). These were greatly enjoyed by the large congregation, and the church is to be congratulated in having so capable an organist.
     On Monday evening Mr. Arthur Workman, deputy to his brother, Mr. Albert E. Workman, at Emmanuel Church, Bootle, occupied the organ stool, and gave the following items:- Andante (Hesse); Reverie and Meditation (Arthur Workman); Reverie (Massanet); March of the Israelites from "Eli" (Costa); Adagio (Kuhlau), and as concluding voluntary a Coronation March of his own composition. Mr. Workman must be congratulated on his able handling of the instrument, the second and sixth numbers being especially sweetly rendered. It is of interest that Mr. Workman had written a "Dedication March" for this occasion, dedicated to Mr. C.R. Bradley.
     On Tuesday night Mr. A. Wilcock, Mus. Doc., of St.Nicholas' Church, Blundellsands, was assisted by the St.Nicholas Church choir during Evensong, the Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis being Stanford's setting in B. Flat, and the anthem "Who is like unto Thee" (Sullivan). After the service, which was beautifully sung, Dr. Wilcock played the following: - Fantasia in F (Freyer); Romance in D Flat (Lemare); Fantasia Rustique (Wolstenholme); March on theme of Handel (Guilmant). Dr. Wilcock is undoubtedly an accomplished musician, and has a great future.
     The series of recitals was completed on Wednesday evening by a visit from Mr. H. Goss-Custard, Mus. Bac., assisted by the Liverpool Cathedral Choir, who gave a perfect rendering of the service, including the Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis (Stammers in A), and the anthem "Praise the Lord" (Garrett), the boy soloists being Masters Sorensen and Davey, while the tenor solo in the anthem was sung by Mr. Bert Pope with great feeling. The choir having retired after Evensong, Mr. Goss-Custard proceeded with his recital, and showed that he is a master of the "king of instruments." His second number, Hollin's "Spring Song," was delightful, being perfectly played. The full recital comprised - Con moto moderato (Smart); Spring Song (Hollins); Sonata in F minor, No. 1 (Mendelssohn); Curfew (Horsman); Overture in Memoriam (Sullivan).
     Seen afterwards, Mr. Goss-Custard expressed himself as "exceedingly pleased with the instrument."
     The Vicar, after thanking the recitalist and the choir for their services, asked for a generous collection, remarking that everyone was delighted with the beautiful singing and playing, and should feel it a privilege to assist in paying for so fine an instrument.
     There was a very large congregation, and the collection realised over 11, making a total since Saturday of 50 10s. towards the Organ Fund.
     The church has recently also received two gifts, one an oak reading chair and desk from Mr. C.H. Warburton in gratitude for the safe return of his brother, Mr. J.T. Warburton, and the other a set of oak collection plates, presented by Mr. and Mrs. Gordon.
 

WALTON TIMES Friday 10th October 1919