SS. John and James' C.of E. Church, Orrell

 

Names on Memorial
BIOGRAPHY RANK FORENAME SURNAME REGIMENT MEDAL OTHER
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  WATKINSON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  E TBAKER
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment (1914-1918)

  RBATEMAN
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  HBEAMISH
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery

  J ABLAKEMORE
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also Service Records Discovering Anzacs

  T CCATON
The St James War Memorial Project


  ADAWSON
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also Service Records Library and Archives Canada

  JDAY
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also Service Records Library and Archives Canada

  RDAY
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  J BDICKSON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  WELLISON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  TFOSTER
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  WFOSTER
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  J CGABBOTT
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  J AGOLDROP
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  RGREENLAND
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  A MHAMILTON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  THAYWOOD
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  GHENSHAW
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  JJOHNSON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  JKENYON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  EKNIGHT
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  BLEGGATT
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery

  H HLILLEY
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  E DMERCER
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  TMERCER
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  WMOFFATT
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  S JNELSON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  GPERKINS
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  J EPIPPRELL
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  E CROME
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  E EROWLAND
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery

  A JSINGLETON
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  PSMITH
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  WSMITH
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  W SSWAIN
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  E HTAYLOR
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  W HWAREING
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  WWILSHAW
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  W AWOOD
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  JYOUNG
 

The creation of the Memorial

 
ORRELL CHURCH MEMORIAL.
IMPRESSIVE SERVICE AT SS.JOHN AND JAMES.'
     A crowded congregation at S.S.John and James' Church, Orrell, testified their deep sympathy for relatives when at a special service on Tuesday night Col. Hemelryk unveiled and the Bishop of Liverpool dedicated their parish tribute to fallen soldiers and sailors. The principal memorial takes the form of a beautiful oak reredos and a side tablet bears the names, numbering 41, of those who gave their lives for the great cause of King and Country. Associated with this is a supplementary memorial - two figures of St.John and St.James - erected by Mr. C. Clarkson in remembrance of his daughter Margaret, who was a devoted church worker.
     The tribute, according to inscription, is:-
     "In Loving and Grateful Memory of the following Men, who gave their lives in the Great War, 1914-1918, and of Margaret S. Clarkson. 'They served for Liberty, for Life they died.' 'Their names shall be had in everlasting remembrance.'"
     Then follows the names:-
William ATKINSON,
Eric T. BAKER,
Robt. BATEMAN,
Herbert BEAMISH,
John A. BLAKEMORE,
Thomas C. CATON,
Allan DOWSON,
Robert DAY,
Joseph DAY,
Jas. B. DICKINSON,
W. ELLISON,
William FOSTER,
Tom FOSTER,
John C. GABBOTT,
John A. GOLDROP,
Richard GREENLAND,
Abraham M. HAMILTON,
Thomas HAYWOOD,
George HENSHAW,
John JOHNSON,
James KENYON,
Ernest KNIGHT,
Bernard LEGGATT,
Herbert H. LILLEY,
Eric D. MERCER,
Thomas MERCER,
Walter MOFFATT,
Samuel J. NELSON,
John E. PIPPRELL,
George PERKINS,
Edwin C. ROME,
Ernest E. ROWLAND,
Alfred J. SINGLETON,
William SMITH,
Peter SMITH,
William S. SWAINE,
Edward H. TAYLOR,
Wm. A. WOOD,
William H. WAREING,
W. WILSHAW,

James YOUNG,

     The total cost of the Memorial will be about 545, and the greater portion of this amount has been contributed by members of the congregation and parishioners. It is the work of Messrs John Hardman and Co., Birmingham. The subject of the reredos centre panel is "The Great Sacrifice," the theme a now well-known picture, and beneath are the words "Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friend." Arrangements in connection with the Memorial have been carried out by the Vicar, Rev E Walbancke Jones, the wardens, Messrs F.F. Kelly and W. Singleton, and other church officers, Mr J. McKee, 34, Markfield-road, being the hon. secretary and treasurer.

THE DEDICATION

     Colonel P.H. Hemelryk and a detachment of the 7th King's with the regimental band, under the direction of Bandmaster A. Sharpe, attended the service, and the Bishop of Liverpool, with a number of local and district clergy, were also present. A short, simple service, conducted by the Vicar, opened by the singing of "The Son of God goes forth to war." Mr. Kingston Fell presided at the organ, and the singing was led by an efficient choir. Other hymns sung during the service were "Fight the good fight," and "For all the saints"; also Psalm 23, "The Lord is my Shepherd." A beautiful anthem, "The Radiant Morn," tastefully rendered by the choir, was a feature of the service. The Lesson was from Wisdom iii, 1-9.
     After the anthem, while the congregation was standing, Colonel Hemelryk, the Vicar and Wardens, proceeded to the Memorial Reredos, and the Vicar, approaching Bishop Chavasse, said "My Lord Bishop, I request you to dedicate this Reredos to the glory of God and in grateful memory of the men from this Parish and Congregation of SS John and James', who gave their lives in the Great War: also in affectionate remembrance of Margaret L. Clarkson."
     Col P.H. Hemelryk, T.D., then unveiled the Reredos, and the Bishop pronounced the dedication: - "In the Faith of Jesus Christ, we dedicate this Reredos to the glory of God, and in memory of the men of this Parish and congregation, who fell in the Great War of 1914-1918, and in memory of His servant, Margaret L Clarkson; in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, Amen."
     Immediately following the dedication the Last Post was sounded by the regimental buglers and the organist played Chopin's Funeral March. The ceremony was very impressive.

"BEING DEAD YET SPEAKETH"

     The Bishop delivered a forceful discourse based on the words "He being dead yet speaketh." (Heb. xi. 4). He said the reredos with which they had adorned that House of Prayer in memory of 41 gallant men, who had laid down their lives for their country and their God, would speak long after the present congregation had passed away. It would seem to say to them and to those who came after. "Follow us as we followed Christ." Many of those men had never dreamt of being soldiers, but when the call of their country came they sprang to arms, leaving behind those whom they loved best, and with a song on their lips and a smile on their faces went out to fight and to fall for their country. They had left us a message to follow in their footsteps, to show in theses days of peace the same spirit of self-sacrifice that they displayed; the spirit which enabled us to win the war, and which alone would enable us to reap the fruits of peace. God forbid that we as a nation should slip back into a state of selfishness. Rather let us by a life of self-denial try to save the country for which those men died. Don't let it be thought that they had died in vain.
     In the second place these heroes would say "Carry on the work we have begun; don't let us have laid down our lives to no purpose." We were face to face with difficulties and dangers quite as great as those which faced our men at the front. We were told our country could only be saved from bankruptcy by our people studying and practicing economy. They were asked - each of them - to do a fair day's work for a fair day's wages, and to help our country by producing as much as they possibly could. These men would say "Carry on our work by ceasing to be extravagant, and do your best to make the country what it ought to be." Let them imitate those brave men in their spirit of brotherliness. They threw off all feelings of suspicion, prejudice, class hatred, difference of creed, and in the face of a common danger stood side by side. The industrial unrest we were experiencing could only be averted and checked by following these men, and exercising a like spirit of brotherhood.

THE MENACE OF IMPURITY

     There was another phase of our present social life which needed to be dealt with. It was said that after every war the flood-gates of immorality were opened. This seemed to have happened a hundred years ago, and it was manifestly happening again to-day. No right-feeling person could contemplate the moral state of England without pangs of distress. It appeared as though our national morality was shaken to its foundation. This was deplorable, and all against the welfare of our country. Other great empires, like Greece, Persia, and Spain, had fallen through impurity and uncleanness of life, and it would destroy us unless we conquered it. He appealed to them all to save our country by living pure lives. He asked young maidens to be modest in their demeanour and young men to bear in mind our Lord's words, "Blessed are the pure in heart." Otherwise, if they gave way to the temptations that beset them the death-knell of our country would be sounded.
     Further needs of our day were to carry on the work of cultivating the fear of God. We had been experiencing what was termed a slump in religion, but he believed there never had been a time when at bottom men and women were longing more for God - though they sought to hide that longing - than was the case to-day. Moreover, there was a claim that care should be taken of those whom their brave men had left behind. That duty was incumbent upon them, and he trusted they would realise and fully carry out the responsibility.
     A collection was then taken for the War Memorial Fund.
     The special Memorial Services will be continued at S.S.John and James' on Sunday next. His Worship the Mayor and members of the Corporation will attend the morning service, when the pulpit is to be occupied by the Rev. Colin T. Dawson, a former vicar of the parish. The present Vicar is announced to preach in the evening.
 

BOOTLE TIMES Friday 24th September 1920

 
BOOTLE CHURCH WAR MEMORIAL.
MAYORAL VISIT TO SS.JOHN AND JAMES'.
     Services at S.S.John and James' Church, Orrell, on Sunday were again of a memorial character, and parishioners attended in considerable numbers. The Mayor (Coun. Harry Pennington) accompanied by the Deputy Mayor (Ald. Dr. Pearson), and several members of the Town Council, including Mr. Jas. Spencer, the newly-elected representative of Derby Ward, Councillors W. Vaux, F. W. King, T. Ashton, and T. Harris, attended at Morning Prayer. Service was conducted by the Rev. E. Walbancke Jones, Vicar, who announced that about 85 was required to complete the payment for the reredos and tablet which are being erected to memorialise 41 parishioners who fell during the recent war.
     The Rev. Colin T. Dawson, St.James', Toxteth Park, a former Vicar of the parish, delivered an appropriate discourse based on Luke xxii, 42. He spoke of the great conflict from which we had emerged successfully through the wonderful patriotism and self-sacrifice of our men. It behoved them to pray that the victory which God had granted to our arms should be made fruitful for the universal benefit of our people and of mankind. It was right and fitting that we should have memorials in our houses of prayer to remind us and future generations of those who had loved their country so well that they were prepared to make the utmost sacrifices, even the sacrifice of life itself, on its behalf. Moreover it should tend to remind us in these stirring times when history was being rapidly made, when we were dazed by the mighty rush of international events, of the great conflict that was still going on, the conflict between the lower will of man and the higher Will of God. In this respect the greatest victory the world had ever known was that won by Our Lord in the Garden of Gethsemane. God forbid that after what had been done for us, after the worthy example we had had set before us, we should drift back into the condition of a careless, prayerless nation. He trusted all would take a worthy part in the great conflict which is being waged, remembering that the greatest victory which could be won was to overcome self. Let it be made manifest to the world that with Divine help they were trying to become better men and women.
     At evening service the Vicar of the parish made appreciated reference to the work of the late Miss Margaret Clarkson.
 

BOOTLE TIMES Friday 1st October 1920