Litherland Constitutional Club

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
Names on Memorial
BIOGRAPHY RANK FORENAME SURNAME REGIMENT MEDAL OTHER
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  B E ADAMS Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour
also Litherland Digital

Lieutenant NormanBARK Died 01-Oct-18
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  JBISHOP Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  R WBRIGHOUSE Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  J HBUCKLE Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  CCHARLES Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  J A VCLAYTON Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  F H COSLETT Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  R H COURTNEY Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  R H CRITCHLEY Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  H ACUTTS Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  HDAWBER Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  JDOWNING Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  HEMMETT Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  JEVERALL Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  HFERGUSON Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  TFYLES Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  HGARDNER Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  A C GOSDEN Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  A GREENHOW Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  S WGRIFFIN Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  J RGRIFFITHS Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  H LGRIMSHAW Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  S L HANCOCK Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  A HHARTSHORN Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Pte JHEANEY Died 09-Apr-18
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  W H HOCKEN Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  EHODGE Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  C J HOGAN Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  B H HOLROYD Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  THOPWOOD Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  W BHOULDING Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  EJOHNSON Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  CJONES Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  E R JONES Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  J MJOYCE Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  S F GLAYBOURNE Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Corpl NLEE Died Ypres 31-Jul-17
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  R E LEE Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  TLEISHMAN Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  H ELIGHTFOOT Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  JMACPHERSON Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  A MALTPRESS Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  C E MANTON Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  WMARSH Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  TMCGRATH Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  JMILLICHIP Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  RMORRIS Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  RNEEDHAM Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Pte WOVINGTON Died 20-Sep-17
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  B WPEEL Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  W T PHILLIPS Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  WPINNINGTON Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  PRILEY Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  J WROBERTS Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  WROBERTS Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  W J ROGANS Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  W BROYCE Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  J RSIDDALL Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


Lieut A WSMITH Died 18-Mar-18
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  WSTACEY Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  GSTANLEY Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  J PSTEELE Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  DSTERLING Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  G P STEWART Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  A E TAYLOR Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  A GWALSH Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  A S WALSH Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  TWESTHORP Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  J AWHALEY Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  E A WHITE Survived
Merseyside Roll of Honour


  TWOOD Survived
 

The creation of the Memorial

 
WAR HEROES.

SEAFORTH AND LITHERLAND MEMORIAL.

UNVEILING CEREMONY.

     Seventy-two members of the Seaforth and Litherland Constitutional Club served in H.M. Forces during the recent war. Of these five were killed. A Commemorative tablet, which will bear their names has just been placed at the Club's headquarters "The Elms," Litherland. The memorial was unveiled by the Hon. Sir Arthur Stanley C.B., M.V.O., G.C.B.E., on Saturday evening in the presence of a large assemblage of members and friends, including a good number of ladies.

     Mr T.W. Ibbs, Chairman of the Club, who presided, said that they had met to fulfil a sacred duty. During the past year they had been busily engaged raising funds to provide a suitable and lasting memorial to those of their members who had fought - some having died - for their country. The result they would see shortly. He desired to express their indebtedness to Councillor Scott and Mr. Walter Scott, of Bootle, for the splendid memorial they had produced, - a work that he was sure would be highly appreciated. It was a matter of supreme interest that they had with them their esteemed ex-member whose work with the British Red Cross society which he had so admirably organised and the work he had done during the War, would never be forgotten. (Hear, hear). He would now ask Sir Arthur Stanley to unveil the tablet.
     Before proceeding with the ceremony Sir Arthur expressed warm appreciation of the many kindnesses he had received from friends in that part of his old constituency. But he added they never did him a greater kindness than that which they had conferred in inviting him, as a member of the Club, to unveil this memorial. He thanked Mr. Ibbs for his kind remarks and was grateful to members for associating him with the cause of those among them who had fought, and some of whom had died, for their country.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR

     On the Union Jack which had covered the memorial being removed, a handsome, tastefully designed brass tablet was disclosed. It was in three panels of neat design and in a substantial oak frame. The inscription set forth that it was a Memorial to members of the Seaforth and Litherland Constitutional Club who enlisted in the Great War, August 4th, 1914, to November 11th 1918. On the central panel, within a laurel wreath, were the names of those who fell on active service:- 
Corpl. N. Lee, (Ypres) July 31st, 1917;
Pte. W. Ovington, September 20th, 1917;
Lieut. A.W. Smith, March 18th, 1918;
Pte. J. Heaney, April 9th, 1918;
Lieutenant Norman Bark, October 1st, 1918.
Over the names was the legend "Their name liveth for evermore" and beneath, "Duty nobly done." Names on the outer panels, some of whom had been wounded or otherwise injured were:-
B.E. Adams,
J. Bishop,
R.W. Brighouse,
J.H. Buckle,
R.H. Courtney,
R.H. Critchley,
H.A. Cutts,
J.A.V. Clayton,
C. Charles,
F.H. Coslett,
H. Dawber,
J. Downing,
J. Everall,
H. Emmett,
H. Ferguson,
T. Fyles,
A.C. Gosden,
H.L. Grimshaw,
A. Greenhow,
S.W. Griffin,
H. Gardner,
J.R. Griffiths,
W.H. Hocken,
A.H. Hartshorn,
C.J. Hogan,
T. Hopwood,
S.L. Hancock,
E. Hodge,
B.H. Holroyd,
W.B. Houlding,
E.R. Jones,
E. Johnson,
C. Jones,
J.M. Joyce,
S.F.G. Laybourne,
H.E. Lightfoot,
R.E. Lee,
T. Leishman,
A. Maltpress,
C.E. Manton,
J. Millichip,
T. McGrath,
J. MacPherson,
R. Morris,
W. Marsh,
R. Needham,
B.W. Peel,
W. Pinnington,
W.T. Phillips,
W.B. Royce,
J.W. Roberts,
W.J. Rogans,
W. Roberts,
P. Riley,
J.R. Siddall,
D. Sterling,
G. Stanley,
W. Stacey,
J.P. Steele,
G P Stewart,
A E Taylor,
J.A. Whaley,
T. Westhorp,
A.G. Walsh,
A.S. Walsh,
E.A. White,
T. Wood.

THE SPIRIT THAT WON THE WAR.

     Proceeding Sir Arthur said he did not doubt that relatives of those who had gone would feel proud and glad that the members of the Club had decided to perpetuate their memories. As to the others it was hoped they would live long and render service to their country again if need arose. Their proceedings called to his mind the splendid spirit that had been displayed by our men throughout the war and in different parts of the world. He had seen them at the Front, also at the Casualty Stations, and throughout the four years he had never heard a murmur or a word of complaint. It was due to that spirit that we won the war as we had done. (Hear, hear). He felt sure the names of those who had fought in this spirit would be enshrined, not only on that memorial, but in all their hearts. (Hear, hear). Sir Arthur went on to say that as a Club they had experienced changes since he had met them last. For one thing they had got a new Member of Parliament and the majority they gave him afforded abundant evidence of their confidence in him. (Hear, hear). Nothing had grieved him (Sir Arthur) more than parting form his late constituents, but finding the work would be too much, that he would not be able to serve their interests as a Member of Parliament should, he had no option but to resign. Their new member would always have his goodwill and such assistance as he could render in the discharge of his arduous duties. (Hear, hear). At the present moment there was a great deal of unrest. Well they had expected that. We had gone through great strain and it was a natural sequence. While going through the war - even in our darkest hours - he had always felt that we must have ups and downs. So it had happened, Germany went into the War for two main objects (i) to secure more colonies, and (ii) to get control of the Bagdad railway. Well it was a great comfort to know we had taken Germany's colonies and we had got the Bagdad railway. (Hear, hear). As to the existing state of affairs, it was quite clear they could not demobilise five millions of men without a certain amount of dislocation. They as a body stood for Conservative and Constitutional principles. They as a body stood for his rights, fair working hours and fair pay for their work. It was also necessary to secure trade at home. All these things would come right in due course and he felt confident their new member would stand out to see that the liberties for which our men had fought were properly secured. (Hear, hear).
     At this point Mr A Weber gave an effective rendering of "O Rest in the Lord." Mr C.R. Bradley accompanying. Following the company sang "Creator of all nations" an appropriate hymn specially written for this ceremonial by Mr. J.C. Brodey and dedicated to the Chairman and members of the Club.

THE WORK OF THE RED CROSS.

     Col. Buckley M.P. proposing a vote of thanks to Sir Arthur Stanley remarked that the predominant feeling among them that evening was probably one of sorrow - but of holy sorrow. They appreciated the work of those who had gone from them. Our young manhood had shown during the War that they were capable of taking on responsibility and that they could smile when facing disaster. The British Army had smiled through all its troubles and disasters, and moreover they had taught the French to smile. (Hear, hear). And now it was for those at home to smile too. They must adopt the spirit which actuated our men at the Front face their troubles with a smile, and he had confidence that in the end all would be well. (Hear, hear). Speaking of Red Cross Work Col. Buckley said it owed its inception to Florence Nightingale. A few years after the organisation was started at Geneva and now it had branches all over the world. The finest of these branches was the British, and the high efficiency of that branch was due in great measure to its Chairman - Sir Arthur Stanley. He (Col. Buckley) had seen a good deal of its work at Boulogne and elsewhere and, like many others, he could bear testimony to the beneficent value of its services. (Hear, hear).
     Mr G.D. Killey, J.P., seconding the motion said Sir Arthur Stanley had represented their old division in Parliament for 21 years and during that period he had won the esteem and affection of his constituents. During the past few years Sir Arthur had been prominently and usefully associated with one of the greatest alleviating agencies of the world. (Hear, hear).
     Sir Arthur Stanley replying to the vote of thanks remarked that he was unable to be with them at the recent election. He was then "on the other side" busily engaged receiving prisoners of war and helping to give them needed attention. While there he had opportunity of witnessing one of the grandest sights that ever came under his notice. Standing on the Hohenzollern bridge just behind Gen. Plummer, he saw the British Army marching over the four bridges crossing the Rhine. That, it occurred to him, represented what the ex-Kaiser was said to have termed "A contemptible little Army." (Hear, hear).
     "Abide with me" was then sung and a vote of thank to the Chairman was passed on the proposition of Mr. A. Shennan seconded by Mr. H. Williams. The latter said Mr. Ibbs had taken great interest in forwarding the memorial scheme and it was pre-eminently fitting that the unveiling should have taken place before his year of office closed.
     Singing of the National Anthem concluded a function that will be long remembered by those who took part in it.
 

WALTON TIMES Friday 31st January 1919